Question:

You are downhill skiing, enjoying the thrill and the rush of icy cold air. You ski directly off the slope to the balcony of your

You are downhill skiing, enjoying the thrill and
the rush of icy cold air. You ski directly off the
slope to the balcony of your condominium. You
throw off your gear and within a minute are
comfortably soaking in your hot tub. From the
slope to the tub, you move from a 10-degree
environment to a 120-degree environment.
Select the
statement that best explains how the change from slope
to tub affects the temperature of the cells in your liver?
It does not have an effect on the temperature of the liver
cells. The body works very hard to maintain the internal
environment in a very stable condition
The liver cells warm to close to the hot tub temperature,
The body quickly responds to external stimuli matching the
environmental temperature.
The liver cells initially warm but then over time again cool,
followed by a cycle of warming and cooling. The body
reflects the changing "A cycle "B cycle reproductive
patterns found in eukaryotic liver cells,
The liver cells remain cold reflecting the long exposure to
frigid environmental temperatures experienced during
skiing. The body resists quick changes in temperature due
to the high heat of vaporization of its mostly water content

You are downhill skiing, enjoying the thrill and the rush of icy cold air. You ski directly off the slope to the balcony of your condominium. You throw off your gear and within a minute are comfortably soaking in your hot tub. From the slope to the tub, you move from a 10-degree environment to a 120-degree environment. Select the statement that best explains how the change from slope to tub affects the temperature of the cells in your liver? It does not have an effect on the temperature of the liver cells. The body works very hard to maintain the internal environment in a very stable condition The liver cells warm to close to the hot tub temperature, The body quickly responds to external stimuli matching the environmental temperature. The liver cells initially warm but then over time again cool, followed by a cycle of warming and cooling. The body reflects the changing "A cycle "B cycle reproductive patterns found in eukaryotic liver cells, The liver cells remain cold reflecting the long exposure to frigid environmental temperatures experienced during skiing. The body resists quick changes in temperature due to the high heat of vaporization of its mostly water content

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Mitochondrial Relatives
“Well that's weird,” Ivy said, thinking out loud. “Mitochondria look like little bacteria and even have some of their
genes! It seems like mitochondria were once bacteria that infected another cell and then they just stayed
together

Biology

Morphology of Flowering Plants Solutions

Mitochondrial Relatives “Well that's weird,” Ivy said, thinking out loud. “Mitochondria look like little bacteria and even have some of their genes! It seems like mitochondria were once bacteria that infected another cell and then they just stayed together. I'm going to look into why this might have occurred. It doesn't make sense to say that mitochondria are pathogens since the cell is not harmed. It benefits from the association." Ali cut her off. “But, could they have once been a pathogen? Or, what if they weren't bacteria, to begin with? Listen to what I found. There are some small, simple eukaryotes called protists that do not have mitochondria like the rest of eukaryotic cells. Instead, they have a mitochondria-like organelle called a mitosome that does not produce ATP, but aids in the formation of iron-sulfur clusters that are incorporated into proteins. Some other protists have a mitochondria-like organelle called a hydrogenosome, which does produce ATP and hydrogen gas but does not use oxygen. If that's the case, then which came first? I think that the eukaryotic cell may already have had other organelles, possibly mitosomes or hydrogenosomes, that evolved into mitochondria.” Ivy wasn't convinced. “Or did a bacterium infect a cell, which later evolved into mitochondria, mitosomes, or hydrogenosomes?" Guide Questions: 1. Based on the information above and other information you've learned in class, select the hypothesis you think is most likely: a. Mitochondria evolved from an engulfed bacterial cell that lost its complex, free-living lifestyle. b. Mitochondria evolved energy-producing capabilities from simpler organelles that gained new functions.